STRATEGIES FOR THE SYNTHESIS, EXTRACTION OF NOVEL COMPOUNDS, FORMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF DERMATOLOGICAL PRODUCTS

Tracey Pirali - Ubaldina Galli (3 ECTS)
Tracey Pirali – Tracey Pirali obtained her degree in Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences in 2004. She then had research experiences in CNRS (Paris, visiting scientist) and Edinburgh (visiting professor). At present she is an Associate Professor in Medicinal Chemistry. She has authored about 30 papers in international journals. Recently, her work was covered by C&EN. She is a named inventor on three patents in the field. She recently co-founded a Spin-off company concentrating on calcium channel modulators. In 2012 she was awarded the Farmindustria Prize by the Italian Chemical Society.

At present she organizes an optional course for Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences last-year students on design and synthesis on novel bioactive compounds and is on the review board of the Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology degree.

Ubaldina Galli – After a PhD in Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Turin and an experience as chemistry laboratory technician, she became Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UPO).  Her research interests include the design and synthesis of novel antitumoral agents, especially in the field of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase, PI3Ks and tubulin.

Academic lecturers: 6

Guest lecturers: 0

Laboratory: 24

Federica Pollastro (2 ECTS)
She received her PhD, sponsored by Indena S.p.a. (Milano- Italy), in Science of Bioactive Substances at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UPO). At present, she is Researcher at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UPO), where she is lecturer of the course Medicinal Plants and Phytochemistry and of the Laboratory of herbalist preparation and coordinates a phytochemical lab group. Her research interests include phytochemistry, isolation and purification of natural compounds, with a focus on Burseraceae plant family, Cannabis sativa and sesquiterpenic lactones.
Academic lecturers: 6

Guest lecturers: 0

Laboratory: 12

Lorella Giovannelli (2 ECTS)
She received her degree in Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology at the University of Turin in 1998. Currently, she is Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Technology at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UPO). Her research interests focus on the preformulation of pharmaceutical and cosmetic molecules by interaction with excipients/technological adjuvants, formation of supra-molecular inclusion compounds with cyclodextrins and modification of the physical state by techniques such as freeze drying and spray drying.
Academic lecturers: 0

Guest lecturers: 0

Laboratory: 24

Erika Del Grosso - Silvio Aprile (2 ECTS)
Erika Del Grosso – She received her PhD in Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Turin in 2003 and at present she is Assistant Professor at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UPO), where she is lecturer in lecturer in Pharmaceutical Analysis and Analytical Chemistry. Her research interests include the study of the activity, inhibition and enzyme kinetics via LC-MS, the structure-metabolism relationships of drugs via LC-MS, the development of quali/quantitative analytical methods for the characterization of complex mixtures and/or the metabolic products of drugs via LC-UV and LC-MS,  the characterization and determination via LC-MS of the degradation products of molecules of pharmaceutical interest, and the development and validation of analytical methods used in ongoing studies of stability of active ingredients and their formulations (LC-UV and LC-MS).
Academic lecturers: 6

Guest lecturers: 0

Laboratory: 12

Title Strategies for the synthesis, extraction of novel compounds, formulation and analysis of dermatological products (9 ECTS)

Program

 

(i) The main safety principles and techniques used for the synthesis of organic compounds (reaction setup, product isolation and purification);

Pirali T. and Galli U.

A seminar on active ingredients: market, regulatory, quality, development and manufacturing
Guest lecturer

A seminar on batch process scale up and Industrial manufacturing of API
Guest lecturer

(ii) The principles and techniques for the isolation of organic compounds from their natural sources (selective choice of stationary phases, distillation, liquid-liquid repartition);

Federica Pollastro

(iii) The techniques for the formulation of cosmetic and dermatological products;

Guest lecturer

(iv) The key areas of quality control of cosmetic and dermatological products, including chemical and physical analysis (e. g. liquid chromatography, Uv-Vis spectrophotometry), product stability and factors influencing the storage and shelf-life.

Del Grosso E. and Aprile S.

Textbooks

(i)       Practical Organic Synthesis; A student’s guide; R. Keese, M. P. Brandle, T. P. Toube; Wiley.

(ii)  Trease and Evans: Pharmacognosy – Elsevier; Richard J. P. Cannell: Natural Products Isolation – Springer

(iii)  Handbook of Cosmetic Science and Technology; A. O. Barel et al.,  CRC Press; The Design and Manufacture of Medicines; K. Aulton, Elsevier

(iv) Pharmaceutical Analysis: A Textbook for Pharmacy Students and Pharmaceutical Chemists; fourth ed. 2017, Watson D.G. – Elsevier

Objectives

The course aims to provide students with adequate information regarding:

(i) Safety; handling of chemicals; set up of a reaction; TLC and column chromatography;

(ii) Differences between purification techniques; how to choose the right procedures to obtain a pure natural compound from a phytocomplex;

(iii)  Manufacturing techniques of topical dosage forms; preparation of makeup and skincare products.

(iv) Instrumental analysis: sample preparation; liquid chromatography coupled to UV-Vis and mass spectrometry techniques; data validation and delivery.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of:

(i)       Organic chemistry;

(ii)   Organic and inorganic chemistry;

(iii)  Principles of medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical and cosmetic technology

(iv) High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and spectroscopic techniques.

Teaching methods The course makes use of lectures and lab practicals.
Expected Results

At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

(i) Set up a reaction starting from a procedure taken from the literature, monitor it and purify the product;

(ii) Purify natural compounds starting from an extract;

(iii) Formulate synthetic and natural bioactive compounds;

(iv) Perform an instrumental analysis set up for the assessment of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) purity and formulations stability.

Exam modality

The exam mark will be the average mark obtained for each module:

(i) The written test covers the material delivered in lectures and seminars and is made of multiple-choice questions (20) and an exercise (6). Maximum score: 26

For multiple choice questions, 1 point will be obtained for the correct answer, whereas wrong or blank answers will be evaluated 0 points.

The laboratory evaluation considers the commitment, the performance of the student in the laboratory, and the lab notebook writing. Maximum score: 6;

(ii) A project essay to do at home assigned by the instructor entitled “Make your own cosmetic” (70% of the mark). Students will work in teams of 3-4 and the topics will be defined with a step-guide helping to choose materials and techniques discussed during the lectures. Students will be asked to write the protocol to formulate a cosmetic based on scientific literature and patents and motivate their choice, strategies of isolation and formulation (solubility and chemical active principle, isolation and purification, form of administration and possible difficulties in the process). A guide to help developing the project will be given at the end of the lectures. The final valuation will comprehend also the performance of the students during the laboratory (30% of the mark). The essay must be delivered on the day of the exam;

(iii) The performance of the student during the laboratory;

(iv) Written report and data elaboration of laboratory activities

 

TITLE

Strategies for the synthesis, extraction of novel compounds, formulation and analysis of dermatological products (9 ECTS)

PROGRAM

(i) The main safety principles and techniques used for the synthesis of organic compounds (reaction setup, product isolation and purification);

Pirali T. and Galli U.

A seminar on active ingredients: market, regulatory, quality, development and manufacturing
Guest lecturer

A seminar on batch process scale up and Industrial manufacturing of API
Guest lecturer

(ii) The principles and techniques for the isolation of organic compounds from their natural sources (selective choice of stationary phases, distillation, liquid-liquid repartition);

Pollastro F.

(iii) The techniques for the formulation of cosmetic and dermatological products;

Guest lecturer

(iv) The key areas of quality control of cosmetic and dermatological products, including chemical and physical analysis (e. g. liquid chromatography, Uv-Vis spectrophotometry), product stability and factors influencing the storage and shelf-life.

Del Grosso E. and Aprile S.

TEXTBOOKS

(i)       Practical Organic Synthesis; A student’s guide; R. Keese, M. P. Brandle, T. P. Toube; Wiley.

(ii)  Trease and Evans: Pharmacognosy – Elsevier; Richard J. P. Cannell: Natural Products Isolation – Springer

(iii)  Handbook of Cosmetic Science and Technology; A. O. Barel et al.,  CRC Press; The Design and Manufacture of Medicines; K. Aulton, Elsevier

(iv) Pharmaceutical Analysis: A Textbook for Pharmacy Students and Pharmaceutical Chemists; fourth ed. 2017, Watson D.G. – Elsevier

OBJECTIVES

The course aims to provide students with adequate information regarding:

(i) Safety; handling of chemicals; set up of a reaction; TLC and column chromatography;

(ii) Differences between purification techniques; how to choose the right procedures to obtain a pure natural compound from a phytocomplex;

(iii)  Manufacturing techniques of topical dosage forms; preparation of makeup and skincare products.

(iv) Instrumental analysis: sample preparation; liquid chromatography coupled to UV-Vis and mass spectrometry techniques; data validation and delivery.

PREREQUISITES

Basic knowledge of:

(i)   Organic  chemistry;

(ii)   Organic and inorganic chemistry;

(iii)  Principles of medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical and cosmetic technology

(iv) High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and spectroscopic techniques.

TEACHING METHODS

The course makes use of lectures and lab practicals.

EXPECTED RESULTS

At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

(i) Set up a reaction starting from a procedure taken from the literature, monitor it and purify the product;

(ii) Purify natural compounds starting from an extract;

(iii) Formulate synthetic and natural bioactive compounds;

(iv) Perform an instrumental analysis set up for the assessment of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) purity and formulations stability.

EXAM MODALITY

The exam mark will be the average mark obtained for each module:

(i) The written test covers the material delivered in lectures and seminars and is made of multiple-choice questions (20) and an exercise (6). Maximum score: 26

For multiple choice questions, 1 point will be obtained for the correct answer, whereas wrong or blank answers will be evaluated 0 points.

The laboratory evaluation considers the commitment, the performance of the student in the laboratory, and the lab notebook writing. Maximum score: 6;

(ii) A project essay to do at home assigned by the instructor entitled “Make your own cosmetic” (70% of the mark). Students will work in teams of 3-4 and the topics will be defined with a step-guide helping to choose materials and techniques discussed during the lectures. Students will be asked to write the protocol to formulate a cosmetic based on scientific literature and patents and motivate their choice, strategies of isolation and formulation (solubility and chemical active principle, isolation and purification, form of administration and possible difficulties in the process). A guide to help developing the project will be given at the end of the lectures. The final valuation will comprehend also the performance of the students during the laboratory (30% of the mark). The essay must be delivered on the day of the exam;

(iii) The performance of the student during the laboratory;

(iv) Written report and data elaboration of laboratory activities

Last modified: July 13, 2020