IN VITRO SKIN MODELS FOR TESTING AND EVALUATION

Enrique Barrajon, Isabel Devesa, Asia Fernandez-Carvajal, Gregorio Fernandez, Maria Herranz, Vicente Micol, Nuria Caturla, María Matabuena (64 h - 9 ECTS)

Theory: 42 h

Laboratory: 24h

Title In vitro skin models for testing and evaluation (9 ECTS)
Program

 

1.         Individual components as potential biomarker of health skin. Synthesis, metabolic pathways, precursor molecules, function and alterations that can trigger skin imbalances.

Vicente Micol (academic lecturer: 2 hours)

2.         Potential sources for cosmetic and dermatological products. Libraries of potential cosmetics compounds, synergistic mixtures, natural extracts. Chemical analysis equipment for cosmetic products (HPLC, GC-MS).

Vicente Micol (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/Enrique Barrajón (laboratory: 3 hours)

3.         In vitro test: (i) antioxidant capacity test. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of antioxidant capacity suitable for cosmetic molecule screening. Folin, TEAC, FRAP, MDA/TBARS, ORAC, ORACOH, Nitric oxid radical scavenging.

Enrique Barrajón (academic lecturer: 2 hours) and Vicente Micol (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/Enrique Barrajón (laboratory: 3 hours)

4.         In vitro test: (ii) enzymatic assay and extracellular matrix glycation. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of enzymatic assay suitable for cosmetic molecule screening: Collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase, metalloproteinase, tyrosinase and advanced glycation end products.

Isabel Devesa (academic lecturer: 4 hours)/Isabel Devesa (laboratory: 3 hours) and Enrique Barrajón (laboratory: 3 hours)

5.         In vitro skin models for testing and evaluation: (i) Cell culture techniques. Equipment for the cell culture. Safety aspects of cell culture. Cell types and culture characteristics (in vitro differentiation). The cell environment.

Asia Fernández-Carvajal (academic lecturer: 4 hours)

6.         In vitro skin models for testing and evaluation: (ii) Cellular skin models. Different skin cell types, cocultures, 3-D in vitro human skin model systems. Skin-on-a-chip model.

María Herranz (academic lecturer: 1 hour) and María Matabuena (guest lecturer: 1 hour)

7.         In silico techniques to predict the behavior of new molecules on skin. Protein-protein interactions and the design of neurocosmetic peptides. In silico functional studies compare with commercial compounds. In silico ADME.

Gregorio Fernández (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/ Gregorio Fernández (laboratory: 3 hours)

8.         In vitro methods to evaluate neurocosmetics efficacy. Functional evaluation on neuronal activity for novel active ingredients. Methods to determine neuronal excitability, channel functions and neuronal exocytosis.

Isabel Devesa (academic lecturer: 4 hours)

9.         Cellular and molecular biology assay for evaluation of the effectiveness of cosmetic products. Quantifying the effectiveness of skin care products by testing them on skin models.

María Herranz (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/ María Herranz (laboratory: 12 hours). Enrique Barrajón (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/ Enrique Barrajón (laboratory: 3 hours)

10.      Promoting the efficacy tests of a cosmetic product: commercial perspective of the cosmetics industry. Value of the efficacy tests of cosmetic products for a company: Nutroxun. Tracking devices for the final product.

Nuria Caturla – 2 hours (guest lecturer)

11.      On-site small-groups work: Development of a new protocol to measure skin health either in vitro or in silico experiments. Development by groups of a work focused on the optimization of a protocol to assess the efficacy of cosmeceuticals. Take into account start-up, feasibility, cost, time and validation.

María Herranz – 2 hours (academic lecturer), Isabel Devesa-2 hours (academic lecturer) and Enrique Barrajón – 2 hours (academic lecturer)

Sources –  Alexandra P. Marques, Rogério P. Pirraco, Mariana T. Cerqueira and Rui L. Reis. Skin Tissue Models. Elsevier. 2018.

–  Bruno Burlando, Luisella Verotta, Laura Cornara, and Elisa Bottini-Massa. Herbal Principles in Cosmetics. Properties and Mechanisms of Action. Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. 2010.

–  Amparo Salvador and Alberto Chisvert. Analysis of cosmetic products. Elsevier. 2018.

–  The slides of the lectures and additional material such as scientific publications and laboratory protocols will be available to students.

Objectives and expected results The aim of this In vitro skin models for testing and evaluation course is to introduce students to the most up-to-date cellular and multicellular in vitro models employed to assess the efficacy, safety, and mechanism of action of bioactive molecules.

At the end of the course, the student will acquire theoretical knowledge and understanding about the cellular components of human skin as well as about the potential biomarkers of health skin.

The student will acquire the specific scientific terminology and instruments application to analyze and discuss results and experimental data of the principal methods for testing and evaluation bioactive cosmetics.

Finally, the student will gain competence to conceptually design small research projects aimed to building new protocols to measure skin health through in vitro or in silico experiments.

Prerequisites Basic knowledge of molecular and cellular biology.
Teaching methods Lectures held by experts in the field, on-site small-groups work and lab practical.
Exam modality The exam mark will be composed of the average of several parts.

–  A multiple-choice test that will cover the material delivered in lectures and a laboratory part that considers the performance of the student during the laboratory (50% of the mark).

–  Attitude and participation through online formative evaluation tools in the classroom (20% of the mark).

–  A project work developed in the classroom that describes a new efficacy in vitro or in silico test for skin care products, which will be present and defended in class front of an evaluating tribunal constituted by professors of the subject (30% of the mark).

TITLE

In vitro skin models for testing and evaluation (9 ECTS)

 

PROGRAM

  1. Individual components as potential biomarker of health skin. Synthesis, metabolic pathways, precursor molecules, function and alterations that can trigger skin imbalances.

Vicente Micol (academic lecturer: 2 hours)

  1. Potential sources for cosmetic and dermatological products. Libraries of potential cosmetics compounds, synergistic mixtures, natural extracts. Chemical analysis equipment for cosmetic products (HPLC, GC-MS).

Vicente Micol (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/Enrique Barrajón (laboratory: 3 hours)

  1. In vitro test: (i) antioxidant capacity test. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of antioxidant capacity suitable for cosmetic molecule screening. Folin, TEAC, FRAP, MDA/TBARS, ORAC, ORACOH, Nitric oxid radical scavenging.

Enrique Barrajón (academic lecturer: 2 hours) and Vicente Micol (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/Enrique Barrajón (laboratory: 3 hours)

  1. In vitro test: (ii) enzymatic assay and extracellular matrix glycation. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of enzymatic assay suitable for cosmetic molecule screening: Collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase, metalloproteinase, tyrosinase and advanced glycation end products.

Isabel Devesa (academic lecturer: 4 hours)/Isabel Devesa (laboratory: 3 hours) and Enrique Barrajón (laboratory: 3 hours)

  1. In vitro skin models for testing and evaluation: (i) Cell culture techniques. Equipment for the cell culture. Safety aspects of cell culture. Cell types and culture characteristics (in vitro differentiation). The cell environment.

Asia Fernández-Carvajal (academic lecturer: 4 hours)

  1. In vitro skin models for testing and evaluation: (ii) Cellular skin models. Different skin cell types, cocultures, 3-D in vitro human skin model systems. Skin-on-a-chip model.

María Herranz (academic lecturer: 1 hour) and María Matabuena (guest lecturer: 1 hour)

  1. In silico techniques to predict the behavior of new molecules on skin. Protein-protein interactions and the design of neurocosmetic peptides. In silico functional studies compare with commercial compounds. In silico

Gregorio Fernández (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/ Gregorio Fernández (laboratory: 3 hours)

  1. In vitro methods to evaluate neurocosmetics efficacy. Functional evaluation on neuronal activity for novel active ingredients. Methods to determine neuronal excitability, channel functions and neuronal exocytosis.

Isabel Devesa (academic lecturer: 4 hours)

  1. Cellular and molecular biology assay for evaluation of the effectiveness of cosmetic products. Quantifying the effectiveness of skin care products by testing them on skin models.

María Herranz (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/ María Herranz (laboratory: 12 hours). Enrique Barrajón (academic lecturer: 2 hours)/ Enrique Barrajón (laboratory: 3 hours)

  1. Promoting the efficacy tests of a cosmetic product: commercial perspective of the cosmetics industry. Value of the efficacy tests of cosmetic products for a company: Nutroxun. Tracking devices for the final product.

Nuria Caturla – 2 hours (guest lecturer)

  1. On-site small-groups work: Development of a new protocol to measure skin health either in vitro or in silico Development by groups of a work focused on the optimization of a protocol to assess the efficacy of cosmeceuticals. Take into account start-up, feasibility, cost, time and validation.

María Herranz – 2 hours (academic lecturer), Isabel Devesa-2 hours (academic lecturer) and Enrique Barrajón – 2 hours (academic lecturer)

SOURCES

  • Alexandra P. Marques, Rogério P. Pirraco, Mariana T. Cerqueira and Rui L. Reis. Skin Tissue Models. Elsevier. 2018.
  • Bruno Burlando, Luisella Verotta, Laura Cornara, and Elisa Bottini-Massa. Herbal Principles in Cosmetics. Properties and Mechanisms of Action. Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. 2010.
  • Amparo Salvador and Alberto Chisvert. Analysis of cosmetic products. Elsevier. 2018.
  • The slides of the lectures and additional material such as scientific publications and laboratory protocols will be available to students.

OBJECTIVES AND EXPECTED RESULTS

The aim of this In vitro skin models for testing and evaluation course is to introduce students to the most up-to-date cellular and multicellular in vitro models employed to assess the efficacy, safety, and mechanism of action of bioactive molecules.

At the end of the course, the student will acquire theoretical knowledge and understanding about the cellular components of human skin as well as about the potential biomarkers of health skin.

The student will acquire the specific scientific terminology and instruments application to analyze and discuss results and experimental data of the principal methods for testing and evaluation bioactive cosmetics.

Finally, the student will gain competence to conceptually design small research projects aimed to building new protocols to measure skin health through in vitro or in silico experiments.

PREREQUISITES

Basic knowledge of molecular and cellular biology.

TEACHING METHODS

Lectures held by experts in the field, on-site small-groups work and lab practical.

EXAM MODALITY

The exam mark will be composed of the average of several parts.

  • A multiple-choice test that will cover the material delivered in lectures and a laboratory part that considers the performance of the student during the laboratory (50% of the mark).
  • Attitude and participation through online formative evaluation tools in the classroom (20% of the mark).
  • A project work developed in the classroom that describes a new efficacy in vitro or in silico test for skin care products, which will be present and defended in class front of an evaluating tribunal constituted by professors of the subject (30% of the mark).

Last modified: January 07, 2020